Eric SteinhartYour Digital Afterlives: Computational Theories of Life after Death

Palgrave Macmillan, 2014

by Carrie Figdor on November 15, 2014

Eric Steinhart

View on Amazon

What is life after death? Many people may seek an answer to the question by looking to a traditional religion, such as Christianity or Buddhism, and offering its view of an afterlife. In Your Digital Afterlives: Computational Theories of Life After Death (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), Eric Steinhart presents core tenets of digitalism, a theology that transposes philosophical and theological concepts, principles, and arguments about the self, the universe and the nature of divinity into the conceptual framework of computer science. By defending the idea that everything is a computation, Steinhart, who is professor of philosophy at William Paterson University, defends a new way of thinking about the nature of life and the nature of death, and thus about the question of life after death. In his version of digitalism, there is no such thing as judgment in the Christian sense; your soul is simply a program that will rerun on a progression of superior computers.

{ 0 comments }

Michael E. BratmanShared Agency: A Planning Theory of Acting Together

November 1, 2014

One striking feature of humans is that fact that we sometimes act together. We garden, paint, sing, and dance together. Moreover, we intuitively recognize the difference between our simply walking down the street alongside each other and our walking down the street together. The former involves coordinated action and intention; but the latter involves something [...]

Read the full article →

Stephen YabloAboutness

October 15, 2014

A day after Stephen Yablo bought his daughter Zina ice cream for her birthday, Zina complained, “You never take me for ice cream any more.” Yablo initially responded that this was obviously false. But Yablo, who is professor of philosophy and linguistics at MIT, also noticed something interesting: that Zina said something true about their [...]

Read the full article →

Susan HaackEvidence Matters: Science, Proof, and Truth in the Law

October 1, 2014

Our legal systems are rooted in rules and procedures concerning the burden of proof, the weighing of evidence, the reliability and admissibility of testimony, among much else. It seems obvious, then, that the law is in large part an epistemological enterprise.  And yet when one looks at the ways in which judges have wielded epistemological [...]

Read the full article →

Richard FumertonKnowledge, Thought, and the Case for Dualism

September 15, 2014

A few years back, Frank Jackson articulated a thought experiment about a brilliant neuroscientist who knew everything there was to know about the physical world, but who had never seen colors. When she sees a red tomato for the first time, she learns something new: what it’s like to experience red. The Knowledge Argument has [...]

Read the full article →

Samuel SchefflerDeath and the Afterlife

September 1, 2014

Our moral lives are constructed out of projects, goals, aims, and relationships or various kinds.  The pursuit of these projects, and the nurturing of certain relationships, play central role in giving our lives their meaning and value.  This much is commonplace.  What is not frequently noticed is that our practices of valuing and finding meaning [...]

Read the full article →

Anne Jaap JacobsonKeeping the World in Mind: Mental Representations and the Sciences of the Mind

August 15, 2014

Some theorists in the cognitive sciences argue that the sciences of the mind don’t need or use a concept of mental representation. In her new book, Keeping the World in Mind: Mental Representations and the Science of the Mind (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), Anne Jaap Jacobson, Professor of Philosophy and Electrical and Computer Engineering at the [...]

Read the full article →

Elise SpringerCommunicating Moral Concern: An Ethics of Critical Responsiveness

August 1, 2014

The long tradition of moral philosophy employs a familiar collection of basic concepts. These include concepts like agent, act, intention, consequence, responsibility, obligation, the right, and the good. Typically, contemporary moral theorists simply inherit these conceptual materials, and they use them to stake their positions within the terrain that is established by these concepts. But [...]

Read the full article →

Marcin MilkowskiExplaining the Computational Mind

July 15, 2014

The computational theory of mind has its roots in Alan Turing’s development of the basic ideas behind computer programming, specifically the manipulation of symbols according to rules. That idea has been elaborated since in a number of very different ways, but in some form it remains a core idea of the cognitive sciences today. In [...]

Read the full article →

Simon BlackburnMirror, Mirror: The Uses and Abuses of Self-Love

July 1, 2014

At the heart of our moral thinking lies trouble with our selves.  The self lies at morality’s core; selves are intimately connected to the proper objects of moral evaluation.  But a common theme of moral theory is that the self, and concern with the self, is the source of much that is immoral: selfishness, greed, [...]

Read the full article →